Tuesday, September 22
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Tech & Media

Apple to reopen some stores next week

Apple to reopen some stores next week

Tech & Media
The first Apple Store to reopen since the country went into lockdown to prevent the spread of the coronavirus will be on Monday in Boise, Idaho. Apple will reopen a handful of its stores across the country starting next week, the company said Friday. The first Apple Store to reopen since the country went into lockdown to prevent the spread of the coronavirus will be on Monday in Boise, Idaho. Later in the week Apple will reopen some stores in South Carolina, Alabama and Alaska. “Our team is constantly monitoring local health data and government guidance, and as soon as we can safely open our stores, we will,” an Apple spokesman said in a statement. Apple CEO Tim Cook told Bloomberg in an interview n April that it’s deciding which stores to reopen on a city-by-city basis. Shopp...
Twitter employees can work from home forever, CEO says

Twitter employees can work from home forever, CEO says

Tech & Media
Twitter's new policy comes as businesses across the nation are struggling to adapt to social distancing guidelines. Twitter will allow employees to work from home for as long as they want. Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey told his employees Tuesday that many of them will be allowed to work from home in perpetuity, even after the coronavirus pandemic ends, according to a company spokesperson. “Opening offices will be our decision,” the spokesperson said. “When and if our employees come back, will be theirs.” In an email, first obtained by BuzzFeed News, Dorsey said it was unlikely that Twitter would open its offices before September and that all in-person events would be canceled for the remainder of the year. The company will assess its plans for 2021 events later this year. “We ...
U.S. moves to cut Huawei off from global chip suppliers

U.S. moves to cut Huawei off from global chip suppliers

Tech & Media
The reaction from China was swift with a report saying it was ready to put U.S. companies on an “unreliable entity list.” The Trump administration on Friday moved to block shipments of semiconductors to Huawei Technologies from global chipmakers, in an action ramping up tensions with China. The U.S. Commerce Department said it was amending an export rule to “strategically target Huawei’s acquisition of semiconductors that are the direct product of certain U.S. software and technology.” The reaction from China was swift with a report saying it was ready to put U.S. companies on an “unreliable entity list,” as part of countermeasures in response to the new limits on Huawei, China’s Global Times reported on Friday. The measures include launching investigations and imposing restri...
Criminal group that hacked law firm threatens to release Trump documents

Criminal group that hacked law firm threatens to release Trump documents

Tech & Media
A known criminal enterprise released a large set of stolen files, at least some of which appeared legitimate. A cybercriminal gang that hacked a major entertainment law firm claims it will release information on President Donald Trump if it doesn’t receive $42 million in ransom. The group, a known criminal enterprise, didn’t offer any proof it had information compromising to Trump. It did, however, release a large set of stolen files from the law firm, Grubman Shire Meiselas & Sacks. NBC News reviewed some of the documents, and they appear legitimate. The law firm said that Trump is not a client and has never been. A spokesperson for the firm said it wasn't clear which of its clients have been compromised. The group uses ransomware — a type of malicious software — to break...
Can the government look at your web habits without a warrant? Senators hope to clarify that.

Can the government look at your web habits without a warrant? Senators hope to clarify that.

Tech & Media
The Senate rejected by one vote a proposal to require the government to get a search warrant before it investigates people’s digital history. Searches on Google may reveal a person’s deepest secrets, their true loves and enemies, or even just their weekly meal planning. And all that information and more may be available for inspection by the U.S. government — possibly even without a warrant. A debate in the Senate this week provided a stark reminder that while the debate about internet privacy these days usually revolves around creepy advertisements and data collection by big tech companies, the country is still wrestling with how much authority to give federal prosecutors to spy on people’s everyday internet activity. The Senate on Wednesday rejected by one vote a proposal to...